• The Wire and The Bridge publications are the voices of our school.  The newspaper informs, entertains and influences the students, staff and community in Denton, and it shows the world what the high school and the town are like.  That makes you responsible for being accurate, fair and thorough.  Our publications get better and better through your hard work and determination.

     

    Journalists at any level need to be good at many things.  Not only will you be researching, writing, editing, photographing and designing, you will be leading, following, listening, compromising and learning.  Being on a publication requires that you be both a team player and an independent worker. 

     

    Rules:

    1)    Be respectful to others.  Consider how your actions will affect others.

    2)    Be prepared.  Be on time. Meet your deadlines.

    3)    Use school appropriate language and behavior.

    4)    Use your time wisely.  Work on your publication first.

    5)    Keep the room, especially your workspace clean. 

     

    Grades: Writing stories, taking pictures, designing pages, selling ads, making deadlines and all of the other things that go into newspaper or yearbook will make your grade. All students will be required to attend events outside of the journalism class period.  During this time, you will gather photos and information to write stories, captions and headlines.

     

    It is the responsibility of each student to contact the teacher about make-up work.  If you know in advance you will be absent, make sure you get your work in ahead of time and get someone to cover your responsibilities on the staff.  If you make your deadlines through the month, it will be easy for us to cover you if you have to miss school unexpectedly.  However, if you are behind and miss school during deadline week, we will have to get someone else to do your work and there will be no way to make up that work. 

     

    I know that this is going to be a great year for both newspaper and yearbook.  Im looking forward to be working with all of you and seeing both staffs put out some exciting work.

     

    Newspaper Chain of Command

    School Board

    Superintendent

    Dr. Jamie Wilson

    High School Principal

    Shaun Perry

    Adviser

    Larry Turner

    Editor in Chief

    Kris Eckstorm

    Assistant Editor

    Bianca Ramirez

    Feature Editor

    Sports Editor

    Opinion Editor

    News Editor

    Reporters

    Free Lance Reporters and photographers

    Yearbook Chain of Command

    School Board

    Superintendent

    Dr. Jamie Wilson

    High School Principal

    Shaun Perry

    Adviser

    Larry Turner

    Co-Editor in Chief

    Alex Aller & Nicole Mendyka 

    Assistant Editor

    Georgia Earhart

    Photo Editor

    Copy Editor

    Design Editor

    Sports Editor

    Organizations Editor

    People Editor

     

    Yearbook Positions

     

    Editor in Chief: the Editor in chief or Co-editors-in-chief are in charge of the entire paper.  They supervise what topics are covered, make sure the staff members are meeting their deadlines and standards of work, read and edit all stories before they go into the paper and approve the photos and layouts.  The editors are also responsible for helping other staff members learn the skills they need to produce a successful paper, and any other tasks required to produce a quality yearbook.  An executive editor should be responsible with a strong work ethic; strong at writing, photography and design; good at working with people and care about producing a quality book.  

     

    Assistant editor: The next step down from editor in chief.  The assistant editors aid the EIC in making important decisions, proof the paper, and help other staff members. 

      

    Other editors: The following jobs may be taken over by the EIC, the managing editor or have their own editor.

     

    Design editor: Is in charge of the design for the yearbook.  He or she helps decide on the final templates, organizes when and how templates are used, helps staffers with design and edits final layouts.

     

    Copy editor: Helps staff with their writing.  He or she works with editorial board and section editors on story topics, then helps the staff with writing their stories, sidebars and cutlines and edits finished pages for mistakes.  He or she is in charge of making sure that all writing in the yearbook maintains a high quality. May include proofs manager

      

    Section Editors: Are in charge of overseeing a specific section (Sports, People, Organizations, Index.)  A section editor is responsible for making sure important and interesting stories are being covered in that section, the writing, photography and design is well done and well edited, that the deadlines for that section are being made, and any other tasks required to finish the section.  The section editor should be on staff the term we deal with that section.

      

    Reporter:  All staff members have the responsibility of reporter. This includes coming up with story topics, writing questions, interviewing people, writing at least three drafts of their stories, taking photos, designing and laying out pages, selling ads, contacting advertisers, and whatever other jobs are required to put out a quality yearbook.

     

     

    Newspaper Positions

     

    Editorial board:  Made up of editor(s) in chief, managing editors, and selected section editors.  Mr. Turner is a nonvoting member of the Editorial Board.  They make all major decisions for the Wire, in accordance with our editorial policy.

     

    Editor in Chief: the Editor in chief or Co-editors-in-chief are in charge of the entire paper.  They supervise what topics are covered that month, make sure the staff members are meeting their deadlines and standards of work, read and edit all stories before they go into the paper and approve the photos and layouts.  The editors are also responsible for helping other staff members learn the skills they need to produce a successful paper.  Finally, editors in chief are responsible for doing any other work that is needed to get the paper to press.  An executive editor should be responsible with a strong work ethic; strong at writing, photography and design; good at working with people and care about producing a quality paper.   The executive editor is also in charge of writing or assigning the staff editorial.  The Editor in Chief is part of the Editorial Board.

     

    Managing editor: The next step down from editor in chief.  The managing editors aid the EIC in making important decisions, proof the paper, and help other staff members.  Managing Editors are part of the Editorial Board.

     

    Section editors: These editors are in charge of specific sections. A section editor may be selected for the Editorial Board by Mr. Turner if he or she has shown leadership and good judgment and there is an opening on the Editorial Board.

     

    Features Editor:  The features editor is in charge of the features section. Responsibilities include organizing and assigning features topics, supervising students working on their feature stories, editing feature stories and layouts and getting the features section to press.  The features editor makes most decisions concerning the features section.  A features editor should be especially strong at feature style writing and design.  He or she should also be aware what is going on in the high school culture so that the editor can assess what kinds of feature topics will inform and interest the readers most.

     

    Sports Editor:   The sports editor is in charge of the sports section. Responsibilities include organizing and assigning sports topics, supervising students working on their sports stories, editing sports stories and layouts and getting the sports section to press.  The sports editor makes most decisions concerning the sports section.  A sports editor should be especially strong at writing both straight and feature sports stories and good at making stories over the same sport interesting three or four times a year.  He or she should have a good knowledge of sports at this school and sports in general.  The sports editor is also in charge of making sure the paper gets good photos of sporting events.

     

    News Editor: The news editor is in charge of the news section. Responsibilities include organizing and assigning news topics, supervising students working on their news stories, editing news stories and layouts and getting the news section to press.  The news editor makes most decisions concerning the news section.  A news editor should be especially strong at making news stories interesting.  He or she should be knowledgeable of news events at school, in the community and at the state, national and world level.

     

    Opinion Editor: The opinion editor is in charge of the opinion section. Responsibilities include organizing and assigning opinion topics, supervising students working on their opinion stories, editing opinion stories and getting the opinion section to press.  The opinion editor makes most decisions concerning the opinion section.  An opinion editor should be especially strong at writing opinions that are both entertaining and informative.

     

    Photo Editor:  The photo editor keeps up with what events are happening and makes sure the staff takes photos of them, ensures that staff is saving, modifying and placing photos correctly and guards the overall photo quality of the paper.  The photo editor is also in charge of organizing all photos to make sure they are easy for both newspaper and yearbook staffs to access.  Photo editor may work with both the Newspaper and Yearbook staffs, even if he or she is only in one class.

     

    Business Manager:  The Business Manager is in charge of overseeing ad sales, circulation (if there is no circulation manager) and overseeing ads (if there is no ad manager.)

     

    Assistant Editors:  Assistant editors help the section editors as they plan and supervise their sections.  They also help make decisions regarding that section.  An assistant editor should be a responsible staff member who is strong in writing for that section.

     

    Circulation manager:  The circulation editor ensures the paper gets out to the entire school, updates and prints the mailing labels, and makes sure the staff gets the mailing done.  He or she is in charge on paper day/circulation day.

     

    Beat manager:  Assigns news beats to staff members when we are low on news stories, as well as makes sure the beats are carried through. The beat editor also keeps track of unused, but still viable story ideas and keeps a futures folder.

     

    Advertising manager:  The Advertising editor helps organize ad sales and afterwards makes sure all students get their ads done correctly.

     

    Staff Librarian: The staff librarian looks through the exchange papers from other schools and organizes them. Two to four times a month he or she should share any especially useful examples from other schools with the staff.

     

    Event Coordinator:  The event coordinator or event committee makes sure the staff mood is appropriately brightened.  He or she organizes staff social events, and other plans to keep the staff motivated.

     

    Reporter:  All staff members have the responsibility of reporter. This includes coming up with story topics, writing questions, interviewing people, writing at least three drafts of their stories, taking photos, designing and laying out pages, selling ads, contacting advertisers, distributing and mailing papers and helping others to put together the paper and anything else that is necessary to get the paper to press.

     

    Newspaper Policies

     

     

    Controversial issues:

    a. A controversial issue will be defined as a topic which does not allow total agreement to be reached on it.

    b. Staff members will not be instructed to, nor expected to seek out on their own, any controversial issue. They will be expected to cover such issues thoroughly if they should present themselves.

    c. All sides of controversial issues will be presented as completely and fairly as possible.

    d. Political candidates or bond issues will be dealt with as any news items, with objective and balanced reporting. Although the paper will not officially endorse any candidate or bond issue, editorials on the subjects may appear on the opinion pages.

    Letters to the editor:

    a. Space will be provided for letters when possible.

    b. Letters must be signed and writer properly identified and will be checked by the editor for validity of the writer.

    c. The staff will edit for length, grammar, and pronunciation when necessary to meet space requirements.

    d. The editorial board will decide which letters will be published and reserve the right to refuse any.

    Misc.:

    Material that is used to embarrass or ridicule, make fun of or draw undo attention to any person or group in a negative manner will not be considered for publication.

    Reviews:

    a. Reviews of professional artists, books, records, concerts, TV shows and movies will put more emphasis on informing the audience of subjects of interest rather than a critique of the subject.

    b. Those writing reviews should have some sort of involvement, awareness, and knowledge of the genre beyond that of the average reader.

    Bylines:

    a. Columns will carry a byline.

    b. Bylines will be assigned to all major articles.

    c. Photos will carry a photo credit.

    News and Features:

    a. The main emphasis of the Wire will be to inform the readers of GHS news.

    b. Community, state, national, and international news will be included only as it affects the school district and/or individuals within the district.

    c. The school paper will avoid printing stories dealing with students, staff, or faculty members, or administrators being charged with a crime.

    d. If the editorial board finds it necessary to cover a crime as discussed above, the issue will be dealt with -- not the personality-- and coverage will be determined by timeliness.

    e. Unchartered student organizations and off-campus activities will only be included as space allows.

    f. Although the majority of features will appear for their informational value, a few will appear for entertainment value only.

    The purpose of this newspaper is:

    a. To inform readers of interests concerning GHS.

    b. To interpret the facts reported upon clearly and precisely.

    c. To analyze subjects of interest and present them to the reader in a fair and honest way.

    d. To provide stories to entertain the reader.

    e. To serve as a public forum for student expression.

    f. To function as an educational tool to allow students to develop skills in writing, editing, and dealing with people.

    Profanity:

    a. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist’s credibility. Although no laws exist that restrict the use of profanity, the staff must be sensitive to community and school values and take into account the school policy. Therefore, no profanity will be allowed.

    b. The staff must also take care to avoid language that is of a sensitive nature, offensive, demeaning, or prejudicial to any ethnic group, race, religion, or creed.

    c. The editors will consider any issues that may be controversial and rule on them.

    Content:

    a. The newspaper staff is responsible for the content.

    b. The editors will determine what subjects are to be covered and warrant placement in the newspaper.

    c. Once this is determined, the staff reserves the right to select and to limit the amount of content and determine priorities as to the coverage.

    d. Materials which will not be considered publishable involve content which is considered libelous, slanderous, obscene, an invasion of privacy, and which cause physical disruption of normal school activities.

    Staff writing:

    a. The staff is responsible for writing articles assigned and approved by the editorial board.

    b. Students outside of the staff are encouraged to submit materials for publication which will be reviewed by the executive editors for inclusion.

    c. Special columns may be submitted and included for publication by faculty or administration by executive editor approval.

    Editorials:

    a. Staff editorial subjects will be determined by the executive editors; viewpoint taken will be consensus of the staff.

    b. Staff editorials will not be signed as they are a consensus of the staff. One should be included each month and will be written by one of the coeditors whenever appropriate.

    c. Signed editorials are the views of the writer and not necessarily a staff or board consensus.

    Obituaries

    a. As tragic as deaths of the members of the school district may be, they are considered newsworthy and will be covered in the Wire.

    b. Deaths of school personnel (students, faculty, staff, etc.) will be dealt with as straight news unless circumstances call for an editorial (i.e. accident at a bad intersection).

    Errors:

    a. Whenever necessary, major content errors will be corrected in the following issue.

    b. The staff is intent on checking, editing, and proofreading for all mistakes and will try to guard against carelessness, bias, and distortion by emphasis or omission.

    c. Because of the human element involved, mistakes may appear. The staff apologizes for any such occurrences.

    Time, place, and manner of distribution:

    a. The Wire will be distributed on Thursdays and/or Fridays during lunches.

    b. When due to printing problems and holidays, arrangements will be made to alter the time and manner of distribution.

    Illustrations and Photos:

    a. Photographs will be used to promote school activities and student/faculty achievements as well as to provide an insight into GHS life.

    b. Illustrations must be approved by the photo editor, section editor, and executive editors before they will be accepted as newspaper material.

    c. No suggestive, implicative, or obscene gestures will be tolerated, nor will photos that make people appear foolish.

    d. All illustrations must be of a news or entertainment value and relative to the year being covered.

    e. Caricatures or artwork must be carefully done so as not to over exaggerate features which may result in unintended malice.

    Advertising:

    a. The Wire will not carry advertisements for those businesses, establishments, or constituents who do not conform to school morals or values or for any substance or service that is not legally available to teenagers.

    b. All advertising agreements must be signed contracts.

    c. Verbal agreements are nonbinding and not legal.

    d. Prepayments are required for any business that has not established a previous credit reference with the Wire newspaper staff.

    e. The staff will not solicit ads out of the Denton school district. The staff may accept ads when contacted by out-of-town advertisers if the editorial board approves.

    f. The staff reserves the right to refuse any advertisement without explaination.

    Staff dismissals:

    a. Grounds for dismissal include but are not limited to plagiarism, vandalism of equipment, violation of Code of Ethics, missed deadlines and failure to meet minimal education requirements and attendance requirements in accordance with school policies.

    b. The adviser, Editorial Board and a school administrator will review and decide whether staff members in question need to be dismissed.

    c. The dismissed staff member has three school days to submit a written appeal to the adviser.

    d. The adviser, Editorial Board and school administrator will consider the appeal and make a final decision.

     

     

    Editor selection

    a. Staff members must have served on the staff for at least one year or have taken Journalism I.  The editor in chief must be a junior or senior.

    b. The final editor(s) will be chosen by the adviser based on a variety of considerations.

    c. Attending a journalism camp is strongly suggested and considered when students apply for editor positions.

    Prior review policies:

    All copy layouts and photos have to be read and approved by the editor in chief and adviser before going to the printer.

     

    Yearbook Policies

     

    The purpose of the Yearbook

    The Guyer High School yearbook will serve a number of roles in the school and community.

    1. It will supply a complete and accurate historical record of the school year enhanced by copy, specific facts, captions and photos.

    2. It will serve as a memory book by utilizing photographs and copy and will help people relive, react to and enjoy memories of classroom activities, field trips, sporting events, etc.

    3. It will serve as a public relations tool which will circulate through the community while representing GHS. This is not, however, its primary purpose and does not restrict it to the

    printing of only “good news.”

    4. It will function as an educational learning tool and will allow students to develop skills in researching, writing, editing, photography, technology and dealing with people.

    5. It will function as a reference tool by supplying a table of contents, index, photos with identifications and captions, and page numbers.

    6. It will be a student product -- planned, written, edited, and designed by students.

    7. It will be a fair, impartial, ethical, accurate and responsible publication.

     

    Profanity

    1. Although no laws exist that restrict the use of profanity, none will be allowed in the GHS yearbook.

    2. The staff must be sensitive to community and school values and take into account school policy.

    3. The staff must also take care to avoid language that is of a sensitive nature, offensive, demeaning, or prejudicial to any ethnic group, race, religion, or creed.

    4. The Editorial Board will consider any issues that may be controversial and rule on them.

    Content

    1. The Editorial Board will determine content and coverage decisions concerning the yearbook.

    2. Once this is determined, the staff reserves the right to select and to limit the amount of content and determine priorities as to the coverage.

    3. The staff reserves the right to limit the amount of coverage to any group, team, etc.

    4. Materials which will not be considered publishable involve content which is considered libelous, slanderous, obscene, an invasion of privacy, and which cause physical disruption of normal school activities.

    Staff writing

    1. All content in the yearbook should be written by yearbook staff members.

    2. Outside contributions will only be accepted if revised and approved by the Executive Editors.

    Controversial issues

    1. A controversial issue will be defined as a topic which does not allow total agreement to be reached on it.

    2. Staff members will not be instructed to, nor expected to seek out on their own, any controversial issue. They will be expected to cover such issues thoroughly if they should present themselves.

    3. If a controversial issue should surface, both sides (or more if necessary) of the issue will be presented as completely and fairly as possible, focusing on the issues and facts.

    Trivia

    1. It is not the purpose of the yearbook to publish and print trivia as it does not serve as valuable news nor does it hold any historical value. (Examples: baby photos, prophecies, wills, testaments, etc.)

    2. Material that is used to embarrass or ridicule, make fun of or draw undo attention to any person or group in a negative manner will not be considered for publication in the Bridge.

     

    Bylines

    1. Layouts will carry a “Layout by ...” in an unobtrusive part of the layout in 8 pt. type or smaller.

    2. Copy bylines will be reserved for major stories on the layout.

    3. Photos will carry a photo credit, excluding group shots and mugs.

    News and Features

    1. The yearbook staff will cover all activities that occur within the school as are humanly possible.

    2. Community, state, national, and international news will be included only as it affects the school district and/or individuals within the district.

    3. The yearbook will avoid printing stories dealing with students, staff, or faculty members, or administrators being charged with a crime unless it has a direct impact on the school and/or students and can be done in a timely manner.

    4. If the Editorial Board finds it necessary to cover a crime as discussed above, the issue will be dealt with -- not the personality.

    Errors

    1. The yearbook staff is intent on checking, editing, and proofreading for all mistakes and will try to guard against carelessness, bias, and distortion by emphasis or omission.

    2. Each staff member has the initial responsibility for proofreading his/her work. This will be followed by the section editor and executive editors.

    3. Because of the human element involved, mistakes may appear in the yearbook. The staff apologizes for any such occurrences.

    Obituaries

    1. As tragic as deaths of the members of the school district may be, they are considered newsworthy and will be covered in the Bridge.

    2. Deaths of school personnel (students, faculty, staff, etc.) will be dealt with as straight news.

    3. Coverage will appear in the section fitting to the deceased’s

    status at the time of death and will consume no more than a

    fourth of a yearbook page.

    Illustrations and Photos

    1. Photographs will be used to promote school activities and student/ faculty achievements as well as to provide an insight into GHS life.

    2. Illustrations must be approved by the photo editor, section editor, and executive editors before they will be accepted as yearbook material.

    3. No suggestive, implicative, or obscene gestures will be tolerated, nor will photos that make people appear foolish.

    4. All illustrations must be of a news or entertainment value and relative to the year being covered.

    5. Photos will not be manipulated to misrepresent individuals pictured.

    6. Any questionable photo will be referred to the Editorial Board for a decision.

    7. Photos of students who do not attend GHS and are clearly identifiable must sign a photo release form (i.e. a mentor elementary student.)

    Advertising

    1. The Bridge will not carry advertisements for those businesses, establishments, or constituents who do not conform to school morals or values.

    2. All advertising agreements must be signed contracts. Verbal agreements are nonbinding and not legal.

    3. Prepayments are required for any business that has not established a previous credit reference with the Bridge staff.

    4. The staff reserves the right to refuse advertisement.

    5. Whenever students are included in a photo for an ad, a model release must be signed by student (and parent/guardian if student is under 18).

     

    Portrait policy

    Effort will be made to get all 9-12 grade student portraits and all faculty and staff portraits into the yearbook.

    Because of plant deadlines and the possibility of students/staff missing portrait day, being uncooperative or unable to find, the yearbook staff is not responsible for unavailable portraits of students.

    Senior portraits must use Don Painter Photography for their yearbook photo. This is free of charge.

    School district policies for dress code apply for all photos.

    Failure to take a portrait by the designated date will result in no photo published in the yearbook.

     

     

    Time, place, and manner of distribution

    1. The yearbooks will be completed by the first week of March  and delivered in late May.

    2. The business editor will be in charge of distributing the books at a time and place agreed upon by the principal.

    3. Students may pick up a graduate’s book if he/she signs a form taking responsibility for it.

    Staff dismissal

    Staff members may be dismissed from their positions on the Bridge staff if any of the following occur:

    1. Missed a major deadline during the six weeks.

    2. Plagiarism

    3. Quote fabrication

    4. Vandalism, theft or abuse of staff equipment.

    5. Violation of the Denton ISD Student Code of Conduct.

    6. Misconduct of any kind related to ad sales.

    7. Three cumulative discipline referrals regarding classroom behavior such as profanity, malicious gossip or comment or tardiness.

    8. Severe demonstrations of behavior which threaten the stability of the staff are causes for immediate dismissal. Staff members can be dismissed from their positions by the advisor, editor in chief, and assistant editor(s). A student who is removed from a position or the publication can appeal the decision by submitting a letter to the Editorial Board within three school days. Within three days after receiving the letter, the Editorial Board

    and a member of the administration will hold a hearing in the matter and decide the appeal. The adviser and administrator become voting member of the Board.

    CODE OF ETHICS

    Preamble
    Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues. Conscientious journalists from all media and specialties strive to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist's credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behavior and adopt this code to declare the Society's principles and standards of practice.


    Seek Truth and Report It
    Journalists should be honest, fair and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

    Journalists should:

    — Test the accuracy of information from all sources and exercise care to avoid inadvertent error. Deliberate distortion is never permissible.
    — Diligently seek out subjects of news stories to give them the opportunity to respond to allegations of wrongdoing.
    — Identify sources whenever feasible. The public is entitled to as much information as possible on sources' reliability.
    — Always question sources’ motives before promising anonymity. Clarify conditions attached to any promise made in exchange for information. Keep promises.
    — Make certain that headlines, news teases and promotional material, photos, video, audio, graphics, sound bites and quotations do not misrepresent. They should not oversimplify or highlight incidents out of context.
    — Never distort the content of news photos or video. Image enhancement for technical clarity is always permissible. Label montages and photo illustrations.
    — Avoid misleading re-enactments or staged news events. If re-enactment is necessary to tell a story, label it.
    — Avoid undercover or other surreptitious methods of gathering information except when traditional open methods will not yield information vital to the public. Use of such methods should be explained as part of the story
    — Never plagiarize.
    — Tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience boldly, even when it is unpopular to do so.
    — Examine their own cultural values and avoid imposing those values on others.
    — Avoid stereotyping by race, gender, age, religion, ethnicity, geography, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance or social status.
    — Support the open exchange of views, even views they find repugnant.
    — Give voice to the voiceless; official and unofficial sources of information can be equally valid.
    — Distinguish between advocacy and news reporting. Analysis and commentary should be labeled and not misrepresent fact or context.
    — Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two.
    — Recognize a special obligation to ensure that the public's business is conducted in the open and that government records are open to inspection.

    Minimize Harm
    Ethical journalists treat sources, subjects and colleagues as human beings deserving of respect.

    Journalists should:

    — Show compassion for those who may be affected adversely by news coverage. Use special sensitivity when dealing with children and inexperienced sources or subjects.
    — Be sensitive when seeking or using interviews or photographs of those affected by tragedy or grief.
    — Recognize that gathering and reporting information may cause harm or discomfort. Pursuit of the news is not a license for arrogance.
    — Recognize that private people have a greater right to control information about themselves than do public officials and others who seek power, influence or attention. Only an overriding public need can justify intrusion into anyone’s privacy.
    — Show good taste. Avoid pandering to lurid curiosity.
    — Be cautious about identifying juvenile suspects or victims of sex crimes.
    — Be judicious about naming criminal suspects before the formal filing of charges.
    — Balance a criminal suspect’s fair trial rights with the public’s right to be informed.

    Act Independently
    Journalists should be free of obligation to any interest other than the public's right to know.

    Journalists should:

    —Avoid conflicts of interest, real or perceived.
    — Remain free of associations and activities that may compromise integrity or damage credibility.
    — Refuse gifts, favors, fees, free travel and special treatment, and shun secondary employment, political involvement, public office and service in community organizations if they compromise journalistic integrity.
    — Disclose unavoidable conflicts.
    — Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable.
    — Deny favored treatment to advertisers and special interests and resist their pressure to influence news coverage.
    — Be wary of sources offering information for favors or money; avoid bidding for news.

    Be Accountable
    Journalists are accountable to their readers, listeners, viewers and each other.

    Journalists should:

    — Clarify and explain news coverage and invite dialogue with the public over journalistic conduct.
    — Encourage the public to voice grievances against the news media.
    — Admit mistakes and correct them promptly.
    — Expose unethical practices of journalists and the news media.
    — Abide by the same high standards to which they hold others.