• Welcome to Ms. Axtell's
     
    Reading Recovery Web Page!
     
    reading
     
    About Me!
    I have been teaching Reading Recovery for the last 18 years and have a love for early literacy.  I began my teaching career in Lake Dallas and have been in the Denton ISD for the last 12 years.   I have a Master of Education in Reading from TWU and am a Certified Texas Reading Specialist.  I love teaching young learners how to make sense of all they see inside a book and help them discover the wonderful world of reading!  My hope for all my students is that they become independent readers that love to read for a variety of reasons.  My goal is to help children become "lifelong readers." 
     Personally, I am a mother of 2 grown kids (28 and 25) and also have a 4 year old precious grand daughter.  My hobbies, besides reading, include fitness and real estate and traveling to Florida to see my daughter.  :)    
     
     
      
    What is Reading Recovery?
     
    Reading Recovery is a one-on-one early intervention program for first graders who are having difficulty learning how to read and write.   It enables the children to make the accelerated progress neccessary for them to operate in their classroom as active, independent learners and is in addition to the daily classroom reading instruction.  Each child meets with the Reading Recovery teacher every day for 30 minutes and will continue for no more than 20 weeks.  Daily attendance at school and reading at home with a parent are extremely important. The children in Reading Recovery need to accelerate quickly and must have the extra practice at home. 
     
                                                                     Homework
     
     
    Parts of a Lesson
     
     
    Familiar Book Reread:  The student rereads several familiar books. We work on building confidence and fluency.
     
    Running Record:  The student rereads a book that was read for the first time the day before.  The teacher keeps track of the number and types of errors. This helps me to know how to teach my student based on his/her own strengths and weaknesses.
     
    Making and Breaking:  The student works on letter identification, letter formation, letter sounds and the making and breaking apart of words.
     
    Writing a Story:  The student writes a story in a writing notebook using a practice page for working on tricky words. The teacher then writes the student's story on a strip of paper and cuts it apart. The student reassembles the story. This is to work on word recognition, sequencing and fluency. This is also done at home, gluing down the story in a notebook.  I always remind my kids that "if you can read it, you can write it!  If you can write it, you can read it!"
     
    Reading of a New Book:  The student is introduced to and reads a new book each day at the end of the lesson. The new book is kept by the teacher until the folllowing day to be read for a Running Record. This is where we work on old as well as new strategies.
     
     
                                            
                       
                            
                                              Homework:
     
    All students will have homework every night.  This extra practice is extremely important for the Reading Recovery kids.  They must practice their reading constantly and we ask that parents participate and encourage their children to read at home.  Each evening the students reads 3 books plus puts together a cut up story (when it is included). The students must bring their books back to school every day so please help them remember to put them back in their backpacks.
     
    ???Why Read the Same Story Over Again???
     
    Parents often ask the question, "why is my child bringing home the same book over and over to read at home?"  Research has documented that repeated reading:
     
      -improves reading rate and fluency
      -increases vocabulary
      -enhances comprehension
      -helps students feel more confident about their reading and is an activity in which they want to participate.
     
     
    What do you do when the reader gets stuck?
    1. Wait and see if they work it out
    2. Say, "Try that again".
    3.  Say, "look at the picture".
    4. Say, "think what would make sense."
    5.  Say, "read the sentence again and start the tricky word."  Look at first letter or first part of the word.
    6.  If it's too hard, just tell them... :)
     
    What the reader says should make sense, look right and sound right.
     
    Invitation:
    Parents are always welcome and encouraged to come and watch a lesson.  Just let me know when you would like to come and we'll get it arranged! 
     
    Please feel free to contact me at any time with any questions or concerns at:
    (940) 369-2528
     
    Sue Axtell, M.Ed. 
    Reading Specialist
    Reading Recovery Teacher
    Borman Elem. School